Mokuraiken Kempo

Mokuraiken Kempo

Mokuraiken Kempo (Sword of Silent Thunder) is a modified version of Shorinji Kempo, Gado Gung Fu, Wing Chung as well as being heavily influenced by Jeet Kune Do and Filipino Kali systems.  While most Kempo system employ hard linear strikes and kicks, Mokuraiken Kempo is the result of blending the hard linear motions with the softer circular movements of Gung Fu.

There are numerous other types of Kempo/Kenpo but all the systems if traced back to their roots would have a common foundation.

Kenpō (拳法?) is the name of several Japanese martial arts. The word kenpō is a Japanese translation of the Chinese word “quán fǎ“. This term is often informally transliterated as “kempo“, as a result of applying Traditional Hepburn romanization, but failing to use a macron to indicate the long vowel. The generic nature of the term combined with its widespread, cross-cultural adoption in the martial arts community has led to many divergent definitions

Shorinji Kempo (少林寺拳法 shōrinji-kempō?, meaning “Shaolin Temple Fist Method”) is considered a modified version of Shaolin Kung Fu (using the same kanji). It was established in 1947 by Doshin So (宗 道臣 Sō Dōshin?), a Japanese martial artist and former military intelligence agent.

Okinawan Kenpo

Some Okinawan martial arts groups use the term kenpō as an alternate name for their karate systems or for a distinct but related art within their association. This can be illustrated by the official full name of Motobu-ryu style named as “Nihon Denryu Heiho Motobu Kenpo” (“Japan’s traditional tactics Motobu Kenpo”) and by the International Shorin-ryu Karate Kobudo Federation, where Shōrin-ryū is the actual karate style practiced, whereas “hakutsuru kenpo”, or “hakutsuru kenpo karate” is a related but distinctive style also taught by the association. Both the “n” and “m” romanizations are used by various groups.

American Kenpo

Kenpo has also been used as a modern term: a name for multiple martial arts that developed in Hawaii due to cross-cultural exchange between practitioners of Okinawan martial arts, Chinese martial arts, Filipino martial arts, Japanese martial arts and multiple additional influences. In the United States, kenpo is often referred to as Kenpo Karate. The most widespread styles have their origin in the teachings of James Mitose and William Kwai Sun Chow. Mitose spent most of his early years training in Japan learning his family style, Kosho-Ryū (Old pine tree school). James Mitose would later bring that style to Hawaii where he would teach Chow, who would go on to instruct Ed Parker and Bobby Lowe. The system of kenpo taught by Mitose employed hard linear strikes and kicks, pressure point manipulation, circular movement patterns, and joint locking and breaking.